Government of Ethiopia and Humanitarian Partners Launch 2017 Humanitarian Requirements Document

ADDIS ABABA, 17 January 2016 – The Government of Ethiopia and humanitarian partners today officially launched the Humanitarian Requirements Document (HRD) for 2017. The HRD seeks US$948 million to help 9.2 million people with emergency food and non- food assistance mainly in the southern and eastern parts of the country.

“Last year the Government of Ethiopia, with the support of international donors and humanitarian partners, was able to mount the biggest drought response operation in global history. Today, we need that partnership once again as we face a new drought, with 5.6 million in need of urgent [food] assistance,” says Commissioner Mitiku Kassa, Head of the National Disaster Risk Management Commission (NDRMC). “The Government of Ethiopia has committed US$47.35 million as a first instalment for the 2017 HRD,” added the Commissioner.

Failed rains in southern and eastern parts of the country caused by the negative Indian Ocean Dipole have left 5.6 million people in urgent need of food assistance. The 2017 HRD presents prioritized plans in water and sanitation (WASH), agriculture, relief food, nutrition, health, education, protection, shelter and non-food items in the affected areas. Out of the $948 million sought for the 2017 response, US$598 million is targeted for relief food, $105 million for nutrition, and US$86 million for WASH needs.

From the HRD funding requirements, the UNICEF Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) appeal for Ethiopia is US$110.5 million. This includes US$13.6 million to respond to the new influx of South Sudanese refugees in the Gambella region. While the funding will be critical to UNICEF’s ability to respond to immediate needs, it will also be used to take appropriate actions to strengthen preparedness, improve early warning systems and reduce vulnerability, contributing to more resilient communities.

“Within the overall humanitarian requirement appeal for Ethiopia, UNICEF’s priority is to provide children and their families with clean water, adequate sanitation, and access to nutrition and health services. Our other priorities are to help children catch up on schooling they have lost and to protect children against violence and abuse. UNICEF is very grateful to donors who have been so generous in funding our emergency response in 2016 and hope they will continue to provide support in 2017,”says Ms Gillian Mellsop, UNICEF Representative to Ethiopia.

“The needs presented in the HRD for 2017 have been established through a robust, Government-led multiagency meher needs assessment, which took place over three weeks in November and December 2016,” says the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator Ms Ahunna Eziakonwa-Onochie.

“Humanitarian partners stand ready to support the Government in addressing the needs of those Ethiopians affected by this new drought. To do this we count on urgent support from the international community to help us to again save lives and protect Ethiopia’s impressive development gains,” says Ms Eziakonwa-Onochie. “If well resourced, the 2017 Humanitarian Requirements Document will ensure a well-coordinated, timely and prioritized humanitarian response”

KfW provides vehicles to support Mobile Health and Nutrition Teams in Somali region

By Somali Region Mass Media Agency

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Mr. Hassan Ismail, Head of Ethiopian Somali Regional Health Bureau ©2016/Mukhtar Mohamed

JIGJIGA, SOMALI REGION, 13 December 2016– In partnership with UNICEF, the KfW Development Bank, which administers Germany’s financial cooperation in developing countries, provided 15 vehicles to support the Mobile Health and Nutrition Teams (MHNT) across the Somali region.

Regional officials and UNICEF staff attended the handover ceremony in Jigjiga, the capital town of the Somali region. Hassan Ismail, Head of the Ethiopian Somali Regional Health Bureau, emphasizing the benefits of the15 vehicles for MHNT services, said, “The vehicles will contribute for the success of MHNTs to reach vulnerable women and children with basic health and nutrition services in drought-affected pastoralist areas.”

The mobile teams conduct outreach services and targeted campaigns, such as the Enhanced Outreach Strategy (EOS) that provides children vitamin A supplementation, treatment for intestinal worms, and screening for acute malnutrition in far-reaching pastoralist areas.

Fartun Mahdi Abdi, Head of the Water Bureau and representing the Vice President of the Somali region at the ceremony, also reiterated the contribution these vehicles will have to reducing maternal and child mortality as well as strengthening the quality of health services.

 Fartun Mahdi Abdi, left, Head of the Water Bureau, receives keys to the 15 vehicles from Dr. Marisa Ricardo of UNICEF Ethiopia.  ©2016/Mukhtar Mohamed
Fartun Mahdi Abdi, left, Head of the Water Bureau, receives keys to the 15 vehicles from Dr. Marisa Ricardo of UNICEF Ethiopia. ©2016/Mohamed

With the support of donors such as KfW, UNICEF Ethiopia provides the Government of Ethiopia with medicine and other supplies for MHNT operations. As a result, 362,815 medical consultations took place between January and October 2016 across Somali and Afar regions. Forty seven per cent of these are children.

UNICEF Ethiopia, through the generous support of KfW, provided an additional five vehicles to MHNTs in Afar for the same purpose.

Prolonged drought and intermittent flooding has gravely affected these areas in recent years, first caused by the effects of El Niño weather in 2015, and currently from effects of the Indian Ocean Dipole, another climatic phenomena.

Government of Ethiopia and Humanitarian Partners Release 2017 Humanitarian Response Planning Document

ADDIS ABABA, 11 January 2016 – The Government of Ethiopia has released the Joint Government and Partners’ Humanitarian Document, an initial humanitarian response planning document for 2017 while the comprehensive Humanitarian Requirements Document (HRD) is being finalized. Based on the early warning data and modelling undertaken by partners such as UNICEF, the document reflects the joint humanitarian response planning and provides a shared understanding of the crisis, including the most pressing humanitarian needs.

While Ethiopia battles residual needs from the El Niño-induced drought, below average rains in the southern and eastern parts of the country caused by the negative Indian Ocean Dipole, another climatic phenomena, have led to new symptoms of drought. It is anticipated that 5.6 million people will need emergency food assistance in 2017, in addition to those still suffering from effects of El Niño. Ongoing assessments for the HRD will provide total figures of those in need for 2017.

In 2016, international donors contributed US$894 million toward the humanitarian response efforts and from that figure, UNICEF raised US$108.7 million to support the Government of Ethiopia and partners to reach around seven million people with access to health and nutrition care, education, safe water, sanitation and hygiene services, and protection support. At least 73 per cent of those reached were children.

The total anticipated financial requirements for the 2017 HRD is US$1.1 billion, of which, the UNICEF Humanitarian Action for Children (HAC) appeal for Ethiopia is US$110.5 million. This includes US$13.6 million to respond to the new influx of South Sudanese refugees in the Gambella region. While the funding will be critical to UNICEF’s ability to respond to immediate needs, it will also be used to take appropriate actions to strengthen preparedness, improve early warning systems and reduce vulnerability, contributing to more resilient communities.

Immediate responses have already taken shape from regional governments allocating funds to water trucking and fodder provision in the south and south eastern regions, those most affected by the below average rainfall. In 2016 and years prior, UNICEF has supported such emergency interventions, in addition to child health and nutrition, sustainable water and sanitation, quality education for boys and girls, and the protection of children from violence and exploitation. UNICEF Ethiopia looks forward to continuing this support with the Government of Ethiopia and partners in 2017, for every child and their family.

Volunteers Blast Hygiene Message to Halt Acute Watery Diarrhea

By Bethlehem Kiros

ADDIS ABABA, 30 September 2016 – Mickias Fikre, a taxi driver keeps soap in his car and makes sure to wash his hands thoroughly before he eats. According to him, it is a new habit he developed after he saw his friend suffer from Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD). “He was so sick that I thought he would not recover,” he remembers. His friend got better after few days and Mickias learned from the local health centre how to protect himself from the disease. Mickias adds, “It is really helpful that volunteers are travelling throughout our community on trucks, spreading the message on how to stay safe.”

UNICEF and partners response to Acute Watery Diarrhoea outbreak in Ethiopia
ERCS volunteers in Akaki/Kaliti sub-city perform a traditional dance to draw the attention of the community and raise awareness on AWD prevention. © UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Ayene

Ayantu Dadi, 20, is one of the volunteers who is helping communities protect themselves from AWD. A recent college graduate and an Ethiopian Red Cross Society (ERCS) volunteer of over five years, she has been spending the last three months on the UNICEF and ERCS-supported audio truck that drives around the Nefasilk Lafto sub-city.   Since July 2016, UNICEF and ERCS have been conducting mass public awareness campaigns using 10 audio trucks deployed in each of the 10 sub-cities of Addis Ababa.

Ayantu and seven other volunteers meet early in the morning at the Nefasilk Lafto ERCS branch office, then visit the sub-city health office to obtain instructions on the exact locations they need to cover for the day. These locations are selected based on reported cases of AWD, as well as observed risk factors such as poor hygiene and sanitation practices. The volunteers spend about eight hours reaching out the public with awareness-raising messages on how to prevent AWD and recognize its symptoms. “We play music for few minutes to attract people’s attention and then we broadcast the Public Service Announcements on hygiene and sanitation,” she elaborates.

They also stop at designated priority locations, such as crowded locations where they can reach a large number of people, to distribute flyers, put up posters and have one-on-one talks with people who have questions about AWD. “We especially take time to talk with street food vendors and people in economically impoverished communities where the problem seems to be most prevalent,” she explains. According to Ayantu, the outreach helps prevent new cases of AWD as well as identify existing cases. “It is quite satisfying when you find out that your actions actually impact people’s lives. It is what encourages me to keep passing this message every day,” she says.

UNICEF and partners response to Acute Watery Diarrhoea outbreak in Ethiopia
Ayantu Dadi, 20, an ERCS volunteer, teaches a street vendor about AWD. “I only graduated last month so this is what I do full time.” ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Ayene

Since the AWD outbreak was reported in November last year, 7,769 cases have been identified in Addis Ababa alone.

The coordinated response by the Federal Ministry of Health (FMOH) and partners including UNICEF, cases have now continued to decline however, we should not let our guard down.

UNICEF and partners response to Acute Watery Diarrhoea outbreak in Ethiopia
Sintayehu Tsegaye, who had AWD and has recovered, washes the hands of her son Michael, 3, before she gives him orange. “I always keep soap next to the tap so that I wash my hands when I come from outside or from the toilet. I also try my best to drink boiled water and make the rest of my family do the same.” ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Ayene

Sintayehu Tsegaye 45, is among the thousands affected by AWD and was treated for a week in the local AWD case treatment centre (CTC). A mother of two, she has a small business selling potato chips, flowers and grass that is used in Ethiopian coffee ceremonies. “It is hard to be clean all the time when you touch grass all day, use community latrines and live with a big family that does not have the same hygiene practices as you,” she explains, adding that after her recovery from AWD, she has become more careful about practicing proper hygiene measures such as handwashing with soap.

“People in the community don’t always take the information seriously unless they are personally affected by it, but with repeated teaching, I believe many will listen,” says Sintayehu. “Is especially important to spread the message in communities like mine that use shared latrines.”

In addition to public outreach, UNICEF is also supporting the Government of Ethiopia’s efforts to contain and prevent the spread of AWD  by providing supplies for case treatment centres, technical support for case management and infection prevention, and water treatment supplies to safeguard drinking water for households and communities.

Nearly 385 million children living in extreme poverty, says joint World Bank Group – UNICEF study

NEW YORK/ADDIS ABABA04 October 2016 – Children are more than twice as likely as adults to live in extreme poverty, according to a new analysis from the World Bank Group and UNICEF. Ending Extreme Poverty: A Focus on Children finds that in 2013 19.5 per cent of children in developing countries were living in households that survived on an average of US$1.90 a day or less per person, compared to just 9.2 per cent of adults.  Globally, almost 385 million children were living in extreme poverty.

Children are disproportionately affected, as they make up around a third of the population studied, but half of the extreme poor. The youngest children are the most at risk – with more than one-fifth of children under the age of five in the developing world living in extremely poor households.

“Children are not only more likely to be living in extreme poverty; the effects of poverty are most damaging to children.  They are the worst off of the worst off – and the youngest children are the worst off of all, because the deprivations they suffer affect the development of their bodies and their minds,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “It is shocking that half of all children in sub-Saharan Africa and one in five children in developing countries are growing up in extreme poverty.  This not only limits their futures, it drags down their societies.”

The new analysis comes on the heels of the release of the World Bank Group’s new flagship study, Poverty and Shared Prosperity 2016: Taking on Inequality, which found that some 767 million people globally were living on less than $1.90 per day in 2013, half of them under the age of 18. 

“The sheer number of children in extreme poverty points to a real need to invest specifically in the early years—in services such as pre-natal care for pregnant mothers, early childhood development programs, quality schooling, clean water, good sanitation, and universal health care,” said Ana Revenga, Senior Director, Poverty and Equity at the World Bank Group. “Improving these services, and ensuring that today’s children can access quality job opportunities when the time comes, is the only way to break the cycle of intergenerational poverty that is so widespread today.”

The global estimate of extreme child poverty is based on data from 89 countries, representing 83 per cent of the developing world’s population.

Sub-Saharan Africa has both the highest rates of children living in extreme poverty at just under 50 per cent, and the largest share of the world’s extremely poor children, at just over 50 per cent.  South Asia has the second highest share at nearly 36 per cent—with over 30 per cent of extremely poor children living in India alone. More than four out of five children in extreme poverty live in rural areas.   

In addition, the report reveals that even at higher thresholds, poverty also affects children disproportionately.  About 45 per cent of children are living in households subsisting on less than $3.10 a day per person, compared with nearly 27 per cent of adults.

UNICEF and the World Bank Group are calling on governments to:

  • Routinely measure child poverty at the national and subnational level and focus on children in national poverty reduction plans as part of efforts to end extreme poverty by 2030.
  • Strengthen child-sensitive social protection systems, including cash transfer programs that directly help poor families to pay for food, health care, education and other services that protect children from the impact of poverty and improve their chances of breaking the cycle in their own lives.  
  • Prioritize investments in education, health, clean water, sanitation and infrastructure that benefit the poorest children, as well as those that help prevent people from falling back into poverty after setbacks like droughts, disease or economic instability.   
  • Shape policy decisions so that economic growth benefits the poorest children. 
  • UNICEF and the World Bank Group are working with partners to interrupt cycles of poverty and to promote early childhood development – with programs ranging from cash transfers, to nutrition, healthcare and education.

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 Ethiopia specific information:

  • There are 13 million Ethiopian children who live in poor households, 2 million of whom live in extreme poverty.
  • Children are more severely affected by poverty (32.4 per cent) and extreme poverty (5.2 per cent) than adults (29.6 per cent and 4.5 per cent, respectively).
  • The poorest children are found in households whose head is employed in the informal sector. 13.1 per cent of these children live in extreme poverty.

UNICEF and WFP Regional Directors visit El Niño driven drought response in Ethiopia

Afar Region – Ethiopia Ms Leila Pakkala and Ms Valerie Guarnieri, UNICEF and WFP Regional Directors for Eastern and Central Africa, have visited the ongoing government-led drought response where UNICEF-WFP are closely collaborating. The drought is affecting six regions in Ethiopia, and 9.7 million people are in need of urgent food relief assistance including approximately 5.7 million children who are at risk from hunger, disease and lack of water as a result of the current El Niño driven drought.

In Afar Region, where an estimated 1.7 million people are affected by the drought, including 234,000 under-five children, the Regional Directors visited UNICEF/WFP/Government of Ethiopia supported programmes. These included the targeted supplementary feeding programme (TSFP) and an outreach site where one of Afar’s 20 Mobile Health and Nutrition Teams (MHNTs) provides preventive and curative health, nutrition and WASH services to a hard-to-reach community in Lubakda kebele.

Ms Leila Pakkala and Ms Valerie Guarnieri, UNICEF and WFP Regional Directors for Eastern and Central Africa in Ethiopia visit

The Mobile Health and Nutrition Team provides Outpatient Therapeutic Programme (OTP) and targeted supplementary feeding programme (TSFP) services to remote communities. The TSFP is integrated with MHNT services that address under five children and pregnant and lactating women with moderate acute malnutrition, and link them to TSFP when they are discharged from OTP. This solves the challenge in addressing the SAM–MAM continuum of care and preventing moderate acute malnourished children deteriorating into severe acute malnutrition.

The Directors also visited a multi-village water scheme for Afar pastoralist communities in Musle Kebele, Kore Woreda (district) which suffers from chronic water insecurity.

“Valerie and I are hugely impressed by the work of the WFP and UNICEF teams in Afar,” said UNICEF’s Pakkala.  “The quality of the work being done in such difficult circumstances – from the mobile health and nutrition teams, to WASH, protection, education and advocacy – is remarkable. We were also immensely impressed with the national level partnership between UNICEF and WFP, and our credibility with government and donors. The relationship and collaboration is a model for other countries to learn from and emulate.”

“Ethiopia is showing us that drought does not have to equal disaster,” said Valerie Guarnieri of WFP.  “We can clearly see the evidence here that a robust, government-led humanitarian response – supported by the international community – can and does save lives in a time of crisis.”

UNICEF and WFP continue to support the Government in responding to the current drought with a focus on the most vulnerable and hard to reach communities by using proven context specific solutions and approaches.

Nearly 50 million children “uprooted” worldwide – UNICEF

28 million forcibly displaced by conflict and violence within and across borders

Across the globe, nearly 50 million children have been uprooted – 28 million of them driven from their homes by conflicts not of their making, and millions more migrating in the hope of finding a better, safer life. Often traumatized by the conflicts and violence they are fleeing, they face further dangers along the way, including the risk of drowning on sea crossings, malnourishment and dehydration, trafficking, kidnapping, rape and even murder. In countries they travel through and at their destinations, they often face xenophobia and discrimination.

A new report released today by UNICEF, Uprooted: The growing crisis for refugee and migrant children, presents new data that paint a sobering picture of the lives and situations of millions of children and families affected by violent conflict and other crises that make it seem safer to risk everything on a perilous journey than remain at home.  

“Indelible images of individual children – Aylan Kurdi’s small body washed up on a beach after drowning at sea or Omran Daqneesh’s stunned and bloody face as he sat in an ambulance after his home was destroyed – have shocked the world,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake. “But each picture, each girl or boy, represents many millions of children in danger – and this demands that our compassion for the individual children we see be matched with action for all children.”

Uprooted shows that:

  • Children represent a disproportionate and growing proportion of those who have sought refuge outside their countries of birth: they make up about a third of the global population but about half of all refugees. In 2015 around 45 per cent of all child refugees under UNHCR’s protection came from Syria and Afghanistan.
  • 28 million children have been driven from their homes by violence and conflict within and across borders, including 10 million child refugees; 1 million asylum-seekers whose refugee status has not yet been determined; and an estimated 17 million children displaced within their own countries – children in dire need of humanitarian assistance and access to critical services. 
  • More and more children are crossing borders on their own. In 2015, over 100,000 unaccompanied minors applied for asylum in 78 countries – triple the number in 2014. Unaccompanied children are among those at the highest risk of exploitation and abuse, including by smugglers and traffickers. 
  • About 20 million other international child migrants have left their homes for a variety of reasons including extreme poverty or gang violence. Many are at particular risk of abuse and detention because they have no documentation, have uncertain legal status, and there is no systematic tracking and monitoring of their well-being – children falling through the cracks.
Kueth Tney,13, Nyamuoch Gatdet, 9 and Nyatayin Both, 25, (from left to right) victims of the abduction during a deadly cross border raid on 15 April.
Kueth Tney,13, Nyamuoch Gatdet, 9 and Nyatayin Both, 25, (from left to right) victims of the abduction during a deadly cross border raid on 15 April ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Mersha

According to Uprooted, Turkey hosts the largest total number of recent refugees, and very likely the largest number of child refugees in the world. Relative to its population, Lebanon hosts the largest number of refugees by an overwhelming margin: Roughly 1 in 5 people in Lebanon is a refugee. By comparison, there is roughly 1 refugee for every 530 people in the United Kingdom; and 1 for every 1,200 in the United States. When considering refugee-host countries by income level, however, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, and Pakistan host the highest concentration of refugees. 

The report argues that where there are safe and legal routes, migration can offer opportunities for both the children who migrate and the communities they join. An analysis of the impact of migration in high-income countries found that migrants contributed more in taxes and social payments than they received; filled both high- and low-skilled gaps in the labour market; and contributed to economic growth and innovation in hosting countries.

But, crucially, children who have left or are forcibly displaced from their homes often lose out on the potential benefits of migration, such as education – a major driving factor for many children and families who choose to migrate. A refugee child is five times more likely to be out of school than a non-refugee child. When they are able to attend school at all, it is the place migrant and refugee children are most likely to encounter discrimination – including unfair treatment and bullying.

Outside the classroom, legal barriers prevent refugee and migrant children from receiving services on an equal basis with children who are native to a country. In the worst cases, xenophobia can escalate to direct attacks. In Germany alone, authorities tracked 850 attacks against refugee shelters in 2015. 

“What price will we all pay if we fail to provide these young people with opportunities for education and a more normal childhood? How will they be able to contribute positively to their societies? If they can’t, not only will their futures be blighted, but their societies will be diminished as well,” Lake said. 

The report points to six specific actions that will protect and help displaced, refugee and migrant children:

  • Protecting child refugees and migrants, particularly unaccompanied children, from exploitation and violence.
  • Ending the detention of children seeking refugee status or migrating by introducing a range of practical alternatives.
  • Keeping families together as the best way to protect children and give children legal status.
  • Keeping all refugee and migrant children learning and giving them access to health and other quality services.
  • Pressing for action on the underlying causes of large-scale movements of refugees and migrants.
  • Promoting measures to combat xenophobia, discrimination and marginalization.

Ethiopia has a long history as both a sender and receiver of refugees, and its location in the Horn of Africa places it at the centre of one of the largest refugee-generating areas in Africa today. As of 1 July 2016, the United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) reported a total of 741,288 refugees living in Ethiopia, of which nearly 60 per cent (57.2 per cent) are children. This is an increase of more than 600,000 since 2009 with the majority from South Sudan, Sudan, Somalia, and Eritrea. The volatility of this influx has put significant pressure on the government capacity to provide basic social services in affected areas. Host communities and refugees alike suffer from limited social services, including lack of schools, overstretched health facilities, shortage of water and sanitation facilities.