International Women’s Day 2014 – Ethiopia

Here are list of events, that we are aware of, happening for the International Women’s Day 2014 in Ethiopia.

Please add your events in the comments and we will feature them in this blog!

Friday, March 7th 2014: A panel discussion entitled ‘Equality for Women is Progress for All: Celebrating Women’s achievements in Ethiopia’

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Jointly organized by the UN Communication Group and Addis Ababa University Gender Office. The event’s overall objective is to engage young women and men from various faculties of Addis Ababa University in an interactive dialogue as a way of leading social transformation and change.

Panelists are: Ms. Aster Zaoude (Gender Practioner), Ms. Birtukan Gebregzi (Deputy President, Enat Bank), Ms. Chachi Tadesse (Musician & Children’s Activist), Ms. Desta Hagos (Pioneer Artist/Painter), Ms. Ingidaye Eshete (Chair, Ethiopian Women Entrepreneurs Association), Ms. Selamawit Adugna (Youth Representative), Ms. Zenaye Tadesse (Managing Director, Ethiopian Women Lawyers Association) and Moderator Ms Tsedale Lemma (Editor-in-Chief at Addis Standard)

Time & Date: 09:00 – 11:30am; Friday, 7th March 2014

Venue: Eshetu Chole Hall, Faculty of Business and Economics (FBE Campus), Addis Ababa University

Friday March 7th 2014: International Women’s Day ‘‘Stand-Alone Goal on Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment in Post 2015 Agenda”

Location: New Africa Union Complex, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

http://wgd.au.int/en/content/celebration-international-womens-day

Saturday March 8th 2014: International Women’s Day The status of women in Ethiopia and Africa today

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Women NGO bazaar, Debates, art exhibition, movie screening, music performance, drama …

Time & Date: 09:00 – 18:00; Saturday March 8th 2014

Location: Alliance éthio-française d’Addis-Abeba

Entrance: Free

Sunday March 9th 2014: The 11th edition of the annual women only run

‘Choice Women First’ 5km Run is set to take place on Sunday 9 March 2014. 10,000 women and girls are expected to take part in this year’s race. Please go to registration page for information on registration.

The first race was held in May 2004 in light of recognizing the achievements of Ethiopia’s great female athletes and to support the broader changes regarding the role of women in Ethiopia’s economic and social life.

Since then the race has been promoting key messages about women and has become a celebration of the overall contribution of women in our country’s development.

This year the race promotes messages including

“Family Planning with Choice” – DK Ethiopia

“A Prosperous & Peaceful Life for All: The Future We Want” – UN Ethiopia

“Because I am a Girl” – Plan International Ethiopia

http://www.ethiopianrun.org/index.php/women-5k/information

Ethiopia: Ending newborn deaths

This is a re-blog from girlsglobe.org

By Haile Gebrselassie, Save the Children Child Ambassador, two-time Olympic Champion and four-time World Champion.

Credit: Jiro Ose/Save the Children

Credit: Jiro Ose/Save the Children

Ethiopia, my country, is the cradle of humanity. The first stone tools were found here and Lucy, a 3 million year old skeleton and the first Homo sapiens, was found in the village of Hadar, on the southern edge of the Afar triangle.

Our history is ancient and continuous. We are fiercely proud of the fact that we are the only African nation never to have been colonised. But like every nation our history is chequered and we have suffered.

In 1983, when I was ten years old, the first flames of hunger were flickering throughout Ethiopia. It was that year my mother died due to birth related complications. In those days, in my village, this was not very unusual.

My mother died following birth complications. The women of the village tried to help, but when I think back I realise that none of them really knew what they were doing.

In so many ways, we have made progress in saving the lives of mothers and their newborns since then. Today, the number of children dying before their fifth birthday has been halved since 1990.

The number of women who die in childbirth has declined by almost a third – that’s millions of kids who get to grow up with a mother and millions more getting a chance at life.

What we have achieved so far must be celebrated. The actions of our governments over the last fifteen years have brought about the greatest leap in children’s wellbeing survival in history. This change has been brought about by bold political leadership at the highest levels.

But even today, half of all women giving birth in sub-Saharan Africa give birth without any skilled help. Globally, 2 million women also give birth completely alone.  A direct result of this lack of skilled health workers, as Save the Children has shown in a new report today, a million newborn babies die on their first day of life. A single baby’s death is one death too many.

The good news is that we know what needs to change: ensuring every birth is supported by quality trained health care workers who have the expertise to help premature babies survive, deal with birth complications and prevent newborn infections can, with some wider steps, help prevent as many as two-thirds of these newborn deaths.

Every country in the world must ensure that all mothers-to-be have access to a midwife with life-saving medicines and equipment.

Africa is finally a continent on the rise – and children are the key to our continuing success. I want them to grow up to be the doctors, lawyers, teachers and even athletes that they are meant to be. The race for survival is a marathon, not a sprint. We are in this for the long haul. Like long distance running, this will take endurance, commitment and conviction. We have seen the incredible results when we put our minds to it.

The prize for these children is much greater than an Olympic medal. They get a fair chance at life, regardless of how poor their parents are, where they live or whether they are a boy or a girl. This is a race that we can win.

 

Investing in Girls for MDG Acceleration

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With roughly 700 days left until the target date for the Millennium Development Goals, the Secretary-General, along with the two co-chairs and several members of his MDG Advocacy Group, will participate in a moderated luncheon discussion to accelerate progress on the MDGs focusing on girls as a critical investment.  The Secretary-General and the two co-Chairs, President Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Prime Minster Erna Solberg of Norway, will open the programme and Hannah Godefa, a 16-year old UNICEF National Ambassador for Ethiopia and Sumaya Saluja, a member of the Global Education First Initiative’s Youth Advocacy Group, will lead an inter-generational dialogue with the Advocates. The programme will include interventions from other governments, businesses and media leaders, including Tina Brown.

Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations, on his recent influencer piece on LInkedIN said “Today, there are 57 million children out of school – and most of them are girls. While disturbing, this represents a huge opportunity – because we know, from indisputable experience, the benefits of investing in girls. And there is no more valuable investment than in a girl’s education.”

The growing momentum around girls as catalysts for development is undeniable. Malala Yousafzai, whose voice resonated around the world as a champion for girls’ education, has helped advance the importance of addressing this often overlooked issue in philanthropic and core business strategies.

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Hannah Godefa, UNICEF Ethiopia National Goodwill Ambassador, will participate at the World Economic Forum event focusing on girls education. Hannah impressed  many when she made a speech at the highly successful International Day of the Girl Child at UNICEF Head Quarters in October last year on “Innovating for Girls’ Education” and when she moderated the event where Katy Perry was named UNICEF’s newest Goodwill Ambassador. Read biography of Hannah Godefa.

Investing in Girls’ Empowerment for MDG Acceleration session at the World Economic Forum will highlight specific approaches that enable girls and women worldwide to learn, earn, thrive, and control their own destinies. The focus will be on replicating and scaling-up successful quality programmes, promoting innovative approaches including quick adoption of broadband and ICTs for education and health, and encouraging collaboration to ensure the best outcomes for girls and their communities.

Event Details:
Investing in Girls for MDG Acceleration
Luncheon with the SG and MDG Advocates hosted by the UN Foundation
Thursday, 23 January 2014, 12:30 – 2:30 pm
Salon Atlantis, Steigenberger Grandhotel Belvedere, Promenade 89,
Davos, Switzerland

More on event website

Watch the MDG Advocates event live on 23 January (coming soon)

Follow Tweets about “#investingirls” or @UNICEFEthiopia

Working for the voiceless

Following the expansion of means of doing business and economy across the globe, actors effectively running all sorts of activities, labour or manpower in clear terms, is badly needed to fulfill the economic needs and generate capital with high production. Obviously, not all economic systems and enterprises are capable of using advanced technology in the process of coming up with great business and productions for higher productivity. To this effect, children and teenagers enter the risk of being used as cheap labour. Most of, the majority we can say, the children are vulnerable to such unbearable challenges due to poverty, the consequences stemming from broken family, among others. Worse even, they are unaware of their rights, overworked, can’t resist and they don’t know what kind of negative repercussions can they get after all work they are told to do at workplaces.

All forms of work by children under the age laid down in International Labour Organization (ILO) standards (normally 15 years or the age of completion of compulsory schooling subject to some exceptions) are considered as child labour, basically. According to this organization, the worst forms of child labour include: slavery, debt bondage, prostitution, pornography, forced recruitment of children for use in armed conflict, use of children in drug trafficking and other illicit activities, and all other work likely to be harmful or hazardous to the health, safety or morals of girls and boys under 18 years of age. Read more.

The importance of girls education in underdeveloped states

If you are able to read this sentence, you are one of the few fortunate individuals who have had a basic level of education.

Unfortunately for a majority of young girls in developing nations, having the ability to read is a privilege they are not able to enjoy.

Education for women is perceived more as a privilege than a necessity. Currently throughout the world, Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa are known to have the highest rates of illiteracy, including 62 per cent of women in Africa, and 71 per cent in Southern Asia (UNESCO).

These statistics can be traced to a variety of cultural and socio-economic factors in states where women are not deemed fit to explore career opportunities or basic education. This is often due to preset standards of a woman’s role within the home.

In certain instances, girls are subject to run the household at an early age, caring for younger siblings in the absence of a provider. In other instances, young girls are sold for a bride price before reaching the age of ten, thus dropping out of primary school to become a caretaker and wife (UNICEF). Read more