UNICEF Ethiopia seeks US$110.5 million in emergency assistance for 9.2 million children and their families

Malnutrition poses “silent threat” to children, agency’s 2017 appeal says 

NEW YORK/GENEVA/ADDIS ABABA, 31 January 2017 – 48 million children living through some of the world’s worst conflicts and other humanitarian emergencies will benefit from UNICEF’s 2017 appeal, which was launched today.

From Syria to Yemen and Iraq, from South Sudan to Nigeria, children are under direct attack, their homes, schools and communities in ruins, their hopes and futures hanging in the balance. In total, almost one in four of the world’s children live in a country affected by conflict or disaster.

“In country after country, war, natural disaster and climate change are driving ever more children from their homes, exposing them to violence, disease and exploitation,” said UNICEF Director of Emergency Programmes, Manuel Fontaine. 

UNICEF’s Humanitarian Action for Children sets out the agency’s 2017 appeal totaling $3.3 billion, and its goals in providing children with access to safe water, nutrition, education, health and protection in 48 countries across the globe. 

An estimated 7.5 million children will face severe acute malnutrition across the majority of appeal countries, including almost half a million each in northeast Nigeria and Yemen.

“Malnutrition is a silent threat to millions of children,” said Fontaine. “The damage it does can be irreversible, robbing children of their mental and physical potential. In its worst form, severe malnutrition can be deadly.”  

The largest single component of the appeal is for children and families caught up in the Syria conflict, soon to enter its seventh year. UNICEF is seeking a total of $1.4 billion to support Syrian children inside Syria and those living as refugees in neighbouring countries.

In total, working alongside its partners, UNICEF’s other priorities in 2017 are:

  • Providing over 19 million people with access to safe water;
  • Reaching 9.2 million children with formal or non-formal basic education;
  • Immunizing 8.3 million children against measles;
  • Providing psychosocial support to over two million children;
  • Treating 3.1 million children with severe acute malnutrition.

In the first ten months of 2016, as a result of UNICEF’s support:

  • 13.6 million people had access to safe water;
  • 9.4 million children were vaccinated against measles;
  • 6.4 million children accessed some form of education;
  • 2.2 million children were treated for severe acute malnutrition.

UNICEF Ethiopia’s 2017 Humanitarian Appeal for Children (HAC) is for US$110.5 million, which includes US$17.3 million required to provide assistance to refugees.  Together with the Government of Ethiopia and humanitarian partners, UNICEF Ethiopia aims to reach 9.2 million children and their families with access to safe water and hygiene, nutrition, health and protection services and give hope for the future by providing education in emergencies.

Aysha Nur a mother of four is receiving a medical treatment for her child
Fatuma Ahmed 4 is checked for malnutrition by a mobile health extension officer at Lubakda Kebele of Kori Woreda in Afar Regional state. Lubakda, a remote site served by one of Afar’s 20 Mobile Health and Nutrition Teams (MHNTs), is 4km from the nearest health post and 30km from the nearest health centre. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2016/Tesfaye

“In 2017, UNICEF Ethiopia prioritizes humanitarian needs of those affected by the Horn of Africa drought while continuing to support development initiatives to ensure all children and their families have clean water, adequate sanitation as well as access to nutrition and health services. Additional priorities are to support education for children facing emergencies and to protect children against violence and abuse,” said Gillian Mellsop, UNICEF Representative to Ethiopia. “Our ability to respond adequately to the needs of millions of children contributes to future growth and stability in Ethiopia. Through linked humanitarian and development programming, the Government of Ethiopia, UNICEF and our partners’ investments helps build families’ and communities’ resilience against future emergencies.”

While the funding will be critical to UNICEF’s ability to respond to immediate needs, it will also be used to take appropriate action to strengthen preparedness, improve early warning systems and reduce vulnerability as well as contribute to more resilient communities. 

In 2016, UNICEF raised US$108.7 million to provide around 7 million children and their families with life-saving humanitarian assistance to mitigate the impact of the El Niño-induced drought. With severe water shortages, malnutrition and disease outbreaks, the anticipated humanitarian need in 2017 has reduced only slightly, from 9.7 to 9.2 million people.

Though an adequate 2016 ‘kiremt’ rainy season was recorded in many areas of the country, drought conditions and residual effects from the El Niño emergency continue to cause water shortages, malnutrition, disease outbreaks and related protection and education issues, including the closure of hundreds of schools in drought-affected areas.

A new drought expanding across the lowland areas in the Horn of Africa, induced by another weather phenomena, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), is further exacerbating humanitarian needs in the south and south eastern regions of Afar and Somali, as well as parts of Oromia and SNNP. Neighbouring country Somalia is also severely affected, causing 1,325 refugees crossing into the Ethiopian Somali region in the first 17 days of January. Ethiopia is already one of the top refugee-hosting countries in Africa, with 783,401 refugees as of November 2016 hailing from South Sudan, Somalia, Eritrea and Sudan.

Regional experts confirm the polio outbreak is successfully interrupted in Ethiopia and Kenya

Vigilance in Somalia and region still needed before the region is declared polio-free once more.

By Shalini Rozario

Dr. Jean-Marc Olive, Horn of Africa (HOA) Polio Technical Advisory Group (TAG) Chair, chairs proceedings of the HOA Polio Outbreak Final Assessment
Dr. Jean-Marc Olive, Horn of Africa (HOA) Polio Technical Advisory Group (TAG) Chair, chairs proceedings of the HOA Polio Outbreak Final Assessment, and is seated with representatives from the Kenyan Government, WHO, UNICEF and partners such as Rotary International, The Gates Foundation, CDC among others. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Rozario

17 June 2015, Nairobi, Kenya. Government representatives, technical experts, donors, and polio partners gathered on Wednesday, 17 June 2015 to review the polio outbreak status in the Horn of Africa (HOA) Region. The final assessment concluded the following:

  • The assessment team commends the overall robust outbreak response in the HOA with strong vaccination, communication strategy and strengthened surveillance.
  • The assessment team believes that transmission in Kenya and Ethiopia has been interrupted; however, continued undetected low level transmission cannot be ruled out in Somalia

Overall progress in the region was reviewed since onset of the outbreak in April 2013, which resulted in a total of 223 WPV cases across the region (10 in Ethiopia), and remaining challenges ahead were identified. Chaired by the Horn of Africa polio Technical Advisory Group (TAG) Chair, Dr. Jean-Marc Olive, the meeting gave opportunity to strategically reflect on the current outbreak status and required next steps for all three countries. Dr. Ephrem Tekle, Director of the Maternal and Child Health Directorate, Ethiopia Federal Ministry of Health responded positively to the wild poliovirus (WPV) interruption in Ethiopia, and also acknowledged the work ahead to further improve routine immunisation. “Successes achieved in the polio response are due to the political commitment and the support of partners,” said Dr. Ephrem. “We have been successful on SIAs (supplementary immunisation activities) and NIDs (National Immunisation Days). However, I don’t think we are yet fully successful on routine immunisation; there is a lot to do on routine immunisation even though WPV transmission is interrupted.” Dr. Ephrem acknowledged the strong focus on the involvement of religious and clan leaders in the Somali Region, and mobilisation of the community which have been instrumental to some of the immense achievements in the polio legacy process. He cited an example of community leaders asking for a generator so they could continue routine immunisation services. In moving ahead, Dr. Ephrem stressed the importance of sustaining the polio gains made, using the momentum to improve routine immunisation in the country, and also emphasised the importance to intensify the same efforts in regions bordering South Sudan, such as Benshangul Gumuz and Gambella, in light of the immense population migration. The HOA TAG Chair congratulated Dr. Ephrem and the Ethiopia team on their efforts and wished the country success for strengthening routine immunisation in the country, a challenging task. Closing remarks were provided by governments and partners such as Rotary International, CDC, The Gates Foundation, Red Cross, Core Group, USAID, Communication Initiative, UNICEF, WHO and the HOA TAG Chairman. Next steps for countries include working towards the polio legacy transition plan and using polio assets and achievement to further strengthen routine immunisation and beyond. Countries will continue to implement specific recommendations from the external assessment team, and the outbreak response in Somalia will be assessed again after three months. Following the Somalia assessment, the next HOA TAG meeting in August, and continual monitoring of regional progress, it is hoped that soon, the entire HOA region will be declared “polio-free.”

Through the generous support of polio donors and partners such as the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention; Crown Prince Court, Abu Dhabi, UAE; European Union; the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; National Philanthropic Trust; Slim Foundation; Rotary International; Swedish International Development Cooperation; and others, successful interruption of the outbreak in Ethiopia has been achieved. Continued collaboration is critical to sustain gains for polio and routine immunisation for healthy children and families in Ethiopia.

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Sida

In Ethiopia, Nationwide Polio Vaccination Campaign Reaches 13 Million Children

Sahro Ahmed vaccinates a child
Sahro Ahmed vaccinates a child in Warder, Somali region, Ethiopia. © UNICEF Ethiopia/2013/Sewunet

Somali Region, Ethiopia, 12 May, 2014 – Ethiopia kicked off a polio vaccination campaign on 3 October 2013, targeting 13 million children across the country following an emergency response that began in the Dollo Ado refugee camps in June 2013. In July 2013, Ethiopia Reports First Wild Poliovirus Case since 2008.

Ayan Yasin, a four-year-old girl, was one of the first confirmed polio cases in Ethiopia. Ayan lives with her father and mother, a typical pastoralist family, in their house, made of tin, wood and woven bed sheets in a remote secluded area three kilometres from Geladi Woreda in Ethiopia’s Somali Region. Living next to the Somalia border means that the family move frequently between Ethiopia and Somalia – making routine immunisation practices difficult.

When Ayan fell sick, her father took her to the nearest hospital in Somalia where he was told there was very little hope. After many visits to various health posts, Hergeisa Hospital finally confirmed she had Polio. “We call this illness the disease of the wind. We know that there is no cure for it, and that it can paralyse and even cause death. My daughter hasn’t died but it has disabled her forever,” says her father.

Close to 50,000 health workers and volunteers and 16,000 social mobilisers have been deployed all over the country as part of a campaign that includes remote and hard to access areas. With the support of the Crown Prince Court, Abu Dhabi, UAE, UNICEF has procured vaccines to support immunisation efforts particularly for children and the refugee population being hosted in the Somali Region. In total, 135,000 vials or 2.7 million doses of bivalent Oral Polio Vaccine (bOPV) were procured to immunise 2.43 million children with a polio vaccine – a critical input to immunisation activities in the Somali Region and Polio high-risk areas. The support from the Crown Prince Court has also helped to airlift the Polio vaccine to hard-to-reach zones of Afder, Gode and Dollo in the Somali Region.

Synchronised cross-border polio outbreak preparedness and response

Parents of Ayan Yasin Confirmed Wild Polio Virus (WPV-1) case in Degafur rural village
Parents of Ayan Yasin Confirmed Wild Polio Virus (WPV-1) case, lives in a border close to Somalia, in Degafur rural village, Somali region of Ethiopia. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2013/Sewunet

Supplementary Immunisation Activities (SIAs) were conducted in Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya, and Djibouti to accelerate progress towards ending Polio in the Horn of Africa. The synchronised SIAs were an outcome of the Horn of Africa Countries Cross-Border Polio Outbreak Preparedness and Response Meeting in Jigjiga, from 21 to 23 May 2014, where Ethiopia, Somalia, Kenya and Djibouti agreed to strengthen cross-border collaboration to eradicate polio from the Horn of Africa.

To reinforce support and strengthen Polio eradication efforts in the Somali Region, a high-level delegation consisting of Dr Kebede Worku, State Minister of Health, Mr Abdufatah Mohammed Hassen, Vice President of Ethiopia’s Somali Regional State and Head of the Somali Regional Health Bureau, Dr Pierre M’Pele-Kilebou, WHO Representative to Ethiopia, and Dr Willis Ogutu, Head of UNICEF programme in Somali Region, visited Warder in Dollo Zone, the epicentre of the wild polio virus outbreak in Ethiopia, on 14 June 2014. The delegation, together with the Warder Zonal Administration, launched the ninth round of Supplementary Immunisation Activities (SIAs) in the outbreak zone and formally inaugurated the Zonal Polio Outbreak Command Post, which had been established in April 2014 to improve coordination of response activities.

Sustained interventions to ensure long-term success

While the campaigns to vaccinate children against Polio in the Somali Region have been going well, ensuring long-term success in eliminating the disease will require sustained interventions.

Abdufatah Mohammud Hassen believes the best solution is to immunise every child and ramp up routine immunisation activities in the region. “The campaigns are just to stop the emergency but the main thing that we are doing is to reach every child by strengthening the routine EPI and ensuring that the health facilities have the capacity to respond to the demands of the public”

With the help of developing partners like the Crown Prince Court, Abu Dhabi, UAE, Rotary International European Commission of Humanitarian Department (ECHO) and Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, UNICEF together with the Ministry of Health is continuing its efforts so that young children like Ayan Yasin living in the region are protected from the disabling symptoms of the Polio disease.