Ethiopia inaugurates model water supply and waste management project

26 May 2018, WUKRO, Tigray region – Today marks another major milestone in the Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector in Ethiopia with the inauguration of a model water supply, sanitation and waste management system in Wukro Town, Tigray Region. Part of the One WASH Plus programme, the system integrates innovative and resilient solutions to provide WASH services to 73,000 people, including 35,000 children under the age of 15, residing in the town and its satellite villages.

Attending the inauguration were His Excellency Dr. Negash Wagasho, State Minister of Water Irrigation and Electricity, Dr Christian Rogg, Head of the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) in Ethiopia, Ms. Gillian Mellsop, UNICEF Representative in Ethiopia, officials from the Tigray Regional Government and Wukro Town administration officials.

“Ethiopia’s rapid urbanization and population growth has resulted in increased water stress,” said Dr. Negash Wagasho. “The development of adequate, resilient, sustainable and inclusive WASH services is therefore a must to ensure sustainable development of rapidly growing towns. Thus, what we are seeing today is what can be achieved when we put our concerted efforts together.”

“The UK is the largest bilateral donor in the Ethiopian WASH sector and we are proud to fund the excellent work taking place in Wukro, which is supplying vital water and sanitation services to the town and its surroundings,” said Dr Rogg. “I hope the progress in Wukro can serve as an example to be emulated on a national scale.”

UNICEF Representative Gillian Mellsop said the project was one of the greatest achievements of the One WaSH Plus programme and stands as a testament to the tremendous good that can be achieved when everyone pools their resources together towards one common purpose.

“Investments of this nature, both in Wukro and elsewhere in Ethiopia, are not just improving access to essential services but are changing entire lives,” said Dr. Samuel Godfrey, Chief of WASH at UNICEF. “Women and girls no longer have to walk long distances and spend many hours fetching water. Girls can go to school and attend to their schoolwork while mothers have enough time to spend with their children and engage in other productive activities. For communities, a safe and clean environment means fewer disease outbreaks.”

The Wukro project involved expanding the capacity of the town’s existing system to supply water to the town and five satellite villages, integrating it with a “full chain” system for managing liquid sludge and waste (from containment to recycling), improving water and sanitation in institutions such as schools and health facilities, and establishing a business model for managing the facility comprising the local administration and private operators. The low-cost technology deployed in treating domestic liquid waste in selected social housing developments in the town was sourced through a partnership with the Government of Brazil.

The One WASH Plus programme, fully funded by DFID, is implemented by UNICEF in collaboration with the Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity, regional sector bureaus, and the Water Resource Development Fund. The programme also works with the Ministry of Health, the Ministry of Urban Development and Construction, and respective Sector Regional Bureaus, as well as town administrations and town water supply and sewerage utilities.

The programme, which began in 2013, will benefit 250,000 people in eight small towns and surrounding rural villages in Amhara, Oromia, Somali and Tigray regions with a total investment of some US $36 million by targeting communities living in towns and in peri-urban areas. Models such as the one in Wukro, some large and others medium sized, are now a key component of the One WaSH programme across more than 1,000 towns in the four regions in Ethiopia.

Ethiopia’s rapid urbanization and urban development has resulted in increased water stress and high potential for disease outbreaks. The development of adequate, resilient, sustainable and inclusive WASH services is therefore a must to ensure sustainable development of the rapidly growing towns to meet the targets set in the SDGs.

Linking One WASH National Programme and Water Resources Management: UNICEF Ethiopia’s Leverage in the Sector

By Kaleab Getaneh and Jorge Alvarez-Sala

There is a high interdependence between Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services and Water Resources Management. A sustainable supply of good quality drinking water highly depends on how properly the water sources are managed. Similarly, if WASH services provision is not sustainably managed it will have a huge negative impact on the water resource.

The UNICEF and USAID supported project to strengthen the Water Sector Working Group (WSWG) Secretariat started in July 2015 with the aim of establishing a well-functioning platform for the water sector consisting of the WASH and Water Resources Management (WRM) subgroups that contribute to the sustainable development and management of the water resources in the country.

The project has been supporting the reactivation of the WRM Sub Group and the organization of the first-ever Joint Technical Review (JTR) for the WRM sub-sector. The main purpose of the JTR is to bring various stakeholders together and ensure a sustainable coordinated development and management of water, land and related resources in order to maximise the economic and social welfare of the population. This is the basis for the ongoing and future water sector interventions in general and One WASH National Programme in particular.

Developing climate resilient sustainable WASH services under the umbrella of One WASH National Programme require looking into the bigger water resources management picture, including the protection of water sources and the overall water governance issues. To this end, the reactivation and capacitation of the WRM subgroup and the launching of the JTR is significantly contributing to the development of a clear and common agenda for the water resources sector in Ethiopia.

The WRM sub-group has been able to bring together three concerned Ministries: Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity (MoWIE); Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock Resources (MALR); and Ministry of Environment Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC) and key development partners (DPs), academia and civil society organizations (CSOs).

The priorities established by the WRM sub-group include: 1.Irrigation for growth; 2.Legislation of groundwater use; 3. Conflict resolution; 4. Communication/Management Information System; 5. Institutional and Human Capacity; 6. Water quality; and 7. Water Charges/Tariff and Scheme Sustainability. Following the identification of the priority areas, six WRM technical working groups have been established to further pinpoint key bottlenecks and gaps.

Opening speech by H. E. Ato Kebede Gerba, the state Minister of MoWIE. © UNICEF Ethiopia/2018/Jorge Alvarez-Sala

On the 19th April 2018, the WRM JTR kick-off meeting was successfully held by involving more than 85 participants from academic institutions, CSOs, development partners, basin authorities, concerned federal ministries, and regional bureaus of water, environment and agriculture. The workshop was attended by H.E. Ato Kebede Gerba, the state Minister of MoWIE and H.E Ato Kare Chewicha, the state Minister of MoEFCC. It has laid the foundation by bringing the three ministries (MoWIE, MoEFCC and MoANR) together to talk about water resources management in the country.

 

Currently, the six working groups are actively organizing a field mission to review the state of WRM in three selected river basins (Awash River Basin, Rift Valley Lakes Basin and Abay River Basin) and come up with high impact implementable actions. The findings of the field mission will feed into the upcoming Multi Stakeholders Forum, which will bring both WASH and WRM subsectors together for the first time.

The whole process of JTR and MSF is expected to culminate in the preparation of a National WRM Programme document, which is currently being developed with technical and financial support from UNICEF.

UNICEF’s support to the Water Sector Working Group (WSWG), and its sub-groups is possible thanks to the generosity and support of USAID. The JTR kick-off meeting was also financially supported by JICA and the Italian Cooperation Agency.

ONEWASH  – UNICEF Ethiopia’s pivotal role 

By Dr Samuel Godfrey

Two months ago, I asked five friends of mine two critical questions; one where does the water that flows out of your tap come from and second where does the waste that is flushed down your toilet go to? Answers like, from a river or “my toilet waste is flushed down a sewer pipe…where it goes, I don’t know?” These answers are symptomatic of many educated peoples understanding.  Last month, I asked five inhabitants of the northern Ethiopian town of Wukro the same question. All five respondents gave me an articulate description of borehole water as well as the exact location of all the septic tanks.

Water and Sanitation are a daily priority for most of the world and the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) number 6 has been designed to ensure that everyone, everywhere has access to water and sanitation by 2030.

In Ethiopia, UNICEF was ahead of the SDG curve and in 2013 developed a programme called the ONEWASH which was designed to pull all financial resources from the government, aid agencies, development banks and the UN around ONEPLAN.

To develop the ONEWASH programme, UNICEF Ethiopia was delegated by the Government of Ethiopia to design the strategy for a 10 year plan to ensure that the 50 million people gain access to water and 70 million people gain access to sanitation in every house in every town, city and village across Ethiopia. The ONEWASH is the biggest water and sanitation initiative in Africa and requires an estimated investment of US$2.4 billion. See http://www.unicef.org/ethiopia/OWNP_LEAFLET.pdf.

The ONEWASH programme has: ONE plan, ONE Budget, ONE Procurement system, ONE monitoring system and ONE report. Led by the ONEWASH Coordination office in the Government of Ethiopia  Ministry of Water, Irrigation and Electricity  and with financial and technical collaboration with the Ministry of Finance, Education and Health, the ONEWASH was a “showcase” at the 2016 Sanitation and Water for All High Level Meeting.

UNICEF Ethiopia also teamed up with the key financiers in the WASH sector in Ethiopia such as the World Bank, African Development Bank, DFID, Government of Finland and others to set up a Sector Wide Approach (SWAp) pool fund called the Consolidated WASH Account where funds are blended together. To ensure all UNICEFs financial rule and regulations were respected, UNICEF Ethiopia developed a Fiduciary Risk Assessment tool. This is now been worked into a Programme Operational Manual and is used to guide the sector investments.

The SDGs present an opportunity and challenge for UNICEF Ethiopia. If ONEWASH is successful it will improve sanitation and hygiene facilities in hospitals, schools and health centres and will provide essential water supply for areas affected by climate change and drought. It will ultimately result in reducing undernutrition in children and improving the cognitive performance of school goers.

We are working in the WASH sector to complement and partner with other sector financiers to ensure that all children and all women, everywhere: rural and urban – development and emergency -have the right to water, sanitation and hygiene in communities, health centres and schools…..ONEWASH for all…

Dr Samuel Godfrey is Water Supply, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) Section Chief at UNICEF Ethiopia