27,000 People to benefit from Multiple Village Clean Water Supply Project in Tigray

Young girl fetchs water from a new water point built by the support of UNICEF
The Ebo clean water project benefits 27, 000 people in seven villages including 15, 000 school children with clean water in their school and households. Young girls now can attend school regularly without spending more time looking for water. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Bizuwerk

Ebo, Raya Azebo woreda, Tigray 11 February 2015: A multiple clean water supply scheme in Ebo, Raya Azebo woreda of the Tigray National Regional State goes operational today. The project will benefit 27,000 people in seven villages including 15,000 school children with clean water in their school and households.

The Ebo clean water project, with a total cost of 20 million Ethiopian Birr, is a unique project as it not only demonstrates how investments in long term sustainable water supplies can reduce the carbon emissions from water trucks, but also contributes to making Ethiopian towns and villages greener and healthier for women and children. The project shows how resilient water supply solutions can be implemented in areas where there is low average rainfall and difficult hydrological conditions. In addition, it is 70 per cent cheaper than water trucking which has been the practice previously in the villages.

The Regional Government of Tigray and the woreda Administration of Raya Azebo actively partnered with UNICEF Ethiopia to undertake a detailed technical groundwater assessment to locate deep groundwater which could be exploited for this water supply scheme. UNICEF also called on its large national and international expertise to provide high technical support and mobilised funds from UNICEF Germany to finance the construction of the entire water supply scheme.

Multiple clean water scheme inauguration
H.E Ato Alemayehu Tegenu, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Energy and Ms. Anupama Rao Singh, UNICEF Ethiopia Representative a.i. cut the ribbon inaugurating the Ebo multiple water supply scheme facilities. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2015/Bizuwerk

Inaugurating the project, Minister of Water, Irrigation and Energy, H.E Ato Alemayehu Tegenu said, “We went to every corner of the possible system to make the voice of water and sanitation heard. And to promote synergies between all those whose mandate mattered to water. Now, our country has made tremendous progress over the past decade in the water and sanitation sectors and lowered the incidence of water-borne diseases significantly. We now have the opportunity to witness such a breakthrough, made possible through the committed effort of the government, development partners, NGOs, the private sector and the community. Raya Azebo Multiple Village Clean Water Supply Project in Tigray region is one of the exemplary project, providing the community with reliable access to safe water.”

UNICEF Ethiopia Representative a.i. Ms. Anupma Rao Singh said, “UNICEF will increase its technical and financial support to the water supply and sanitation sector in the Tigray Region. We also reaffirm our commitment to finance another 3 multiple village water supply schemes similar to the Ebo scheme with the aim of alleviating the burden of water collection for tens of thousands of women and children in the Tigray region.”

Ethiopia has made substantial progress in improving access to water supply and sanitation coverage since 1990. The recent National WASH Inventory data helps to confirm that, with the 2015 prediction of 57 per cent water supply coverage, Ethiopia is well on track to meet the water target of halving the 86 per cent of the population without water. The completion of such cost effective schemes is an indication that the country is now heading into innovative approaches to address people especially the hard to reach areas who are without access to safe water services.

In Ethiopia, pneumonia is a leading single disease killing under-five children

Kokeb Negussie and her husband Teshome watch their two month old son Moges rest in Romey Village-Amhara Region
Kokeb Negussie and her husband Teshome watch their two month old son Moges rest in Romey Village-Amhara Region ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2012/Getachew

NEW YORK/Addis Ababa, 12 November 2014 – Significant declines in child deaths from pneumonia prove that strategies to defeat the disease are working, UNICEF said on the fifth World Pneumonia Day. But much more is needed to stop hundreds of thousands of children from succumbing to this preventable illness each year.

Pneumonia is still among the leading killers of children – accounting for 15 per cent of deaths, or approximately 940,000 children per year – but deaths from the disease have declined by 44 per cent since 2000, according to figures released recently by UNICEF.

“Pneumonia is still a very dangerous disease – it kills more children under five than HIV/AIDS, malaria, injuries and measles combined – and though the numbers are declining, with nearly 1 million deaths a year, there is no room for complacency,” said Dr. Mickey Chopra, head of UNICEF’s global health programmes. “Poverty is the biggest risk factor, and that means our efforts need to reach every child, no matter how marginalized.”

Deaths from pneumonia are highest in poor rural communities. Household air pollution is a major cause of pneumonia, so children from households which rely on solid fuels such as wood, dung or charcoal for cooking or heating, are at high risk. Overcrowded homes also contribute to higher pneumonia levels. In addition poor children are less likely to be immunized against measles and whooping cough, which are also among major causes of the disease.

Health Extension Worker Shewaye Berhanu administers the PCV vaccine
Health Extension Worker Shewaye Berhanu administers the PCV vaccine ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2011/Lemma

In Ethiopia, pneumonia is a leading single disease killing under-five children. It is estimated that 3,370,000 children encounter pneumonia annually which contributes to 20 per cent of all causes of deaths killing over 40,000 under-five children every year[1]. These deaths are easily preventable and treatable through simple and cost effective interventions. Immunization, good nutrition, exclusive breast feeding, appropriate complementary feeding and hand washing are among the preventive while administration of amoxicillin dispersible tablets and other antibiotics are among the curative methods which can save lives.

With the objective of increasing access to these lifesaving interventions, Ethiopia has made a policy breakthrough of introducing community based treatment of pneumonia through health extension workers in 2010[2]. Since then over 38,000 health extension workers from nearly 15,000 health posts are equipped with the skills and supplies to treat pneumonia at community level using the integrated community case management (iCCM) approach.[3]

Early diagnosis and treatment of pneumonia, and access to health care, will save lives, thus strategies must target low income communities.

The increased use of pneumonia vaccines, particularly in low income countries has led to progress against the disease, but inequities exist even in countries with wide coverage.

 “Closing the treatment gap between the poor and the better off is crucial to bringing down preventable deaths from pneumonia,” Dr Chopra said. “The more we focus on the causes and the known solutions, the faster we will bring this childhood scourge under control.”

UNICEF’s Supply Division has today put out a call to innovators for new, improved and more easily affordable respiratory rate timers to aid in the timely recognition and management of pneumonia.

One simple treatment has had great success: trained community health workers give sick children the antibiotic amoxicillin in a child-friendly tablet form, as part of an integrated case management programme at the community level. Scaling up the availability of similar inexpensive medicines will help to reduce the treatment gap especially among hard to reach populations.

Simple measures such as early and exclusive breastfeeding; handwashing with soap; vaccination; and provision of micronutrients will also reduce the incidence of pneumonia.

[1] Fischer Walker, 2013

[2] National plan on Integrated Community Case management of common childhood illness, FMOH, 2010

[3] UNICEF, Ethiopia Central Data Base, October 2014

On World Refugee Day, UNICEF calls on governments to provide child refugees with the same care, services, dignity and protection as all other children

Children in Leitchour refugee camp, Gambella region Ethiopia.
Children in Leitchour refugee camp, Gambella region Ethiopia. Children are the most affected by the ongoing conflict in South Sudan. ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2014/Bizuwerk

NEW YORK, 20 June 2014 – “As violence plagues Syria and other countries across the region, record numbers of displaced children are seeking sanctuary in Europe, putting them at increased risk – both from the perils of the Mediterranean crossing and the uncertainty of what awaits them in host countries.  Many more child refugees are expected as ‘boat season’ increases the number of people attempting to make their desperate journey.

“Child refugees, many of whom are unaccompanied, are often detained in unsafe and unsuitable conditions.  They are also far more vulnerable to abuse, exploitation, and other violations of their rights.

“Every child is entitled to the protections set out in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child; few need them more than child refugees.  On World Refugee Day, UNICEF calls on governments to provide child refugees with the same care, services, dignity and protection as all other children.

“Through no fault of their own, these children have already lived through trauma beyond the ability of most people to endure; when they seek a safe haven, they should receive exactly that.”

See our Emergency and resilience page, for more refugees related resources

I don’t want a world where all children are healthy, happy and safe to be just a dream. I want it to be reality: Hannah Godefa

Canada mobilizes support for innovation, integrated action for youngest children

#EveryNewborn

Mother and child at Wukro Clinic
Improving newborn and child health also depends on better accountability — and more thorough accounting. Wukro Clinic, Ethiopia ©UNICEF Ethiopia/2009/Tuschman

Toronto/Addis Ababa, 29 May 2014 – Every minute, 10 babies die or are stillborn across the world, a staggering 5.5 million lives ended every year just as they start.  The majority of those deaths are from preventable causes, including prematurity, childbirth complications and newborn infections.

While child death rates have been reduced by almost half since 1990, newborn mortality has increased as a proportion of overall of child mortality, as highlighted by papers published in The Lancet earlier this month.

“We are succeeding in rapidly reducing child mortality because we have made it a global priority, with a commitment to innovation, partnership, and equity,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake.   “We need the same global commitment, and the same political will, to reduce newborn mortality — working together to find new ways of reaching every family.”

Poorer families bear the greatest burden of newborn deaths.  If current trends continue, it will take over a century before a baby in the Central African Republic has the same chances of survival as a baby born in Canada.

Lake hailed Canada’s leadership in galvanizing global support to reduce maternal, newborn and child mortality.  The Toronto Summit will explore the most effective ways to speed up progress on newborn, child and health.

“The fact that not all children and young people around the world have access to critical health care is unacceptable. It must change,” said UNICEF Ethiopia National Ambassador, Hannah Godefa, who was the only young person to speak at the Summit. “I hope we can redouble our efforts and be catalysts for change. I urge all of you today to renew your promise to the women and children of the world and commit to taking concrete action to ending the preventable deaths of women and children. Because I don’t want a world where all children are healthy, happy and safe to be just a dream. I want it to be reality.” she added.

Improving newborn and child health also depends on better accountability — and more thorough accounting.

In 2012 alone, around two out of five births worldwide were not registered. Around the world, nearly 230 million children under age five have never been recorded – meaning they do not have the legal identity they need to access health, education and other services. And the numbers will rise unless action is taken.

But increasing the number of children registered at birth enables governments to improve the planning and budgeting of life-saving interventions, and to summon the political will and civil society support that is needed to meet targets.

“This year we will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child.  Millions of children are still being deprived of the most precious right — the right to survive,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake.  “We must reach every family, every woman, every child, and every newborn.”