Ethiopian Centre for Child Research

The Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI) has established the Ethiopian Centre for Child Research (ECCR) in partnership with UNICEF Ethiopia and Addis Ababa University. The ECCR is inspired by the collaborative work of EDRI and Young Lives Longitudinal Research in Ethiopia as well as the Child Research and Practice Forum, which was also initiated by EDRI, Young Lives and other partners.

Located within the EDRI, ECCR is coordinated by a small team and overseen by a multi-stakeholder advisory board which includes: Addis Ababa University, Central Statistical Agency, EDRI, Education Strategy Centre, Ministry of Finance and Economic Cooperation, Ministry of Women and Children’s Affairs, Ministry of Youth and Sports, National Planning Commission, UNICEF and Young Lives Project.

The mission of the ECCR is to generate multidisciplinary child-focused research and evidence on policy and practice to inform decision and enhance programmatic capacity concerning the development, equity, wellbeing and protection for children in Ethiopia.

 Current Research Activities 

With funding from UNICEF Ethiopia, ECCR and UNICEF jointly presented the main findings from the Chronic Poverty Report at the ‘Child Poverty Conference in the Middle East and North Africa’ in Morocco on 15-17 May, 2017.

The ECCR is currently establishing partnerships and research collaborations with potential researchers and research institutes nationally and globally with initial funding support from UNICEF Ethiopia. The ECCR conducts fundraising activities to ensure the continuous functioning of the centre.

UNICEF Ethiopia has been instrumental in the establishment of the ECCR by providing start-up funding, in addition to undertaking child-focused collaborative research. While the UNICEF-EDRI partnership is expected to continue, ECCR plans to expand its scope of activities and is looking for potential funders in specific areas of child research.

 

 

Cash transfers recognized as most effective way to build resiliency among the poor 

Johannesburg/Addis Ababa- 15 November 2016 –  New evidence released today shows that social cash transfers are working in Africa, and that giving cash to families is leading to numerous positive outcomes, including reducing poverty among the most vulnerable.

 In a new book, From Evidence to Action: The Story of Cash Transfers and Impact Evaluations in Sub-Saharan Africa – launched in Johannesburg today – UNICEF, FAO, and other partners showcase the positive impacts cash transfer programmes have had in eight Sub-Saharan countries (Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Zambia, and Zimbabwe).

“Cash transfers are enabling the poorest families to substantially increase food consumption and improve overall food security,” says Leila Gharagozloo-Pakkala, Regional Director for UNICEF in Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office. “While cash alone is not enough to solve all problems, it is increasingly helping families avoid negative coping strategies, such as taking children out of school, or selling off assets.”

At the Mail & Guardian “Critical Thinking Forum” organized to launch the book, Government and UN representatives discussed what’s working and what challenges remain with national social protection programmes across the region.

The new evidence finds that government-run cash transfer programmes are expanding across the continent, with national social protection strategies often including a cash component. While cash transfers in Africa tend to be provided unconditionally, many countries do include programme messaging to encourage school enrolment and periodic health and nutrition checks for children.

For several years there have been concerns that beneficiaries would waste money, however UNICEF and FAO gathered evidence across a 10-year period through the so-called Transfer Project, which clearly indicates that the majority of recipients are utilising cash transfers to better the living standards of their families, especially children.

Gathered evidence has also fostered strong collaboration among policymakers, development partners and researchers and led to improved social cash transfer policies and practices in Africa. The book can be downloaded at http://bit.ly/2eqXgNo

The new book launched today in Johannesburg features a chapter on the evaluation of the pilot social cash transfer programme in Tigray region which started in 2011. Which was also named Best of UNICEF research for 2016

The programme was introduced by the Bureau of Labour and Social Affairs in Tigray region with support from UNICEF in two woredas (districts), Abi Adi and Hintalo Wajirat – with the aim to improve the quality of life for vulnerable children, older persons, and persons with disabilities.

0x5a3612In Ethiopia, the level of children’s deprivation remains high. In comparison with sub-Saharan Africa, Ethiopian children face one of the highest multidimensional deprivation rates. Of all the child well‑being dimensions used for comparison – nutrition, health, education, housing, water, sanitation, information and protection against violence – 43 million children in Ethiopia are deprived in at least two of the dimensions. An estimated 17.5 million children live on less than US$1.25 per day.

Ethiopia aims to build a comprehensive and integrated social protection system with the vision for all Ethiopians to enjoy social and economic well-being, security and social justice. The Government is committed to establishing the appropriate system, which will ensure the existing regulations and policies are implemented to address poverty and related vulnerabilities. UNICEF’s social protection programme is providing the required support to make the social protection system a reality.

UNICEF’s social protection programme collaborates with the Government of Ethiopia to establish an integrated social protection system that benefits all Ethiopians, particularly the most vulnerable children and their families. One of the key intervention includes providing support to the operationalization of Community Care Coalitions (CCCs) that identify and provide support in communities to vulnerable persons, including children. These are community-led groups that serve as a support mechanism for the vulnerable populations in the community. CCCs are hybrid organizations with representation from both government and civil society organizations.